FAUX-IKAT QUILT (VFNB-115)

Uzbekistan, circa 1970s


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78” high x 69” wide

16” repeat (The entire length of cloth is not shown in the photo.)

Three joined lengths of cotton faux-ikat; each 28”x78” (selvedge to selvedge); 27.5”x78”; 13.5”x72”

Machine-printed faux-ikat front and floral cotton backing; probably printed in the Tashkent Textile Combine.

Three cotton patches on the backing

Cotton batting has been removed

The top photo shows one quarter of the folded kurpa.

Good condition except for area of stains along bottom and small area of light red stain (see detail photos). The cloth is strong with no tears or color runs.

 

Faux-ikat was very popular both for girls’ and womens’ dresses and for bedding quilts and floor cushions. Less expensive than real ikat, it was printed on silk as well as cotton.

There was little furniture in a Central Asian home. Large floor cushions served as seating. Thick quilts (called “kurpa”) were laid on the floor and acted as mattresses and covers. When not in use, they were folded and carefully stacked against a wall. This pile of bedding quilts was called a “chuk”.

The archival photo (c.1930s-40s) by Max Penson shows an Uzbek family taking a meal with their stack of quilts piled neatly behind them. The top left quilt is made from faux-ikat cloth.

The bottom photo was taken recently in the Tashkent kurpa bazaar.

If you are interested in this kurpa, please contact Susan Meller.

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Price: $125.00
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