Other Textiles

This may be from the Altai Mountain region bordering Mongolia

55.5”  high x 80” wide

Machine-embroidered chain stitch on cotton

Machine-quilted red cotton border

Unlined

Very good condition except for stain on top floral border

 

Tus kiiz (Kazakh) and tush kiyiz (Kyrgyz) were often made by a grandmother for a newly married couple, or handed down from mother to daughter. They were deliberately left unfinished at the bottom to ensure that the marriage would continue to bring unbounded happiness. As part of the wedding ceremony, the bride sat in a curtained-off area in front of the tus kiiz. Later it was either hung over the newlyweds’ bed or in the place of honor (tor) – along the back wall of the yurt.

While tus kiis patterns from the Altai Mountain region that borders on Mongolia often have a distinct Mongolian/Chinese influence, this example is more evocative of Russian folk embroidery.

 

If you are interested in this tus kiiz and would like more information please contact Susan Meller.

KAZAKH TUS KIIS (ATTHOTNB-177)

Dated 1985

This may be from the Altai Mountain region bordering Mongolia. Dated 1985
55.5” high x 80” wide
Machine-embroidered chain stitch on cotton
Machine-quilted red cotton border
Unlined
Very good condition except for stain on top floral border

Tus kiiz (Kazakh) and tush kiyiz (Kyrgyz) were often made by a grandmother for a newly married couple, or handed down from mother to daughter. They were deliberately left unfinished at the bottom to ensure that the marriage would continue to bring unbounded happiness. As part of the wedding ceremony, the bride sat in a curtained-off area in front of the tus kiiz. Later it was either hung over the newlyweds’ bed or in the place of honor (tor) – along the back wall of the yurt.

While tus kiis patterns from the Altai Mountain region that borders on Mongolia often have a distinct Mongolian/Chinese influence, this example is more evocative of Russian folk embroidery.

Price: $150.00
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STOCKING BAG (ATSBOTBBNB-120)

USA, circa 1920s

Roller-printed cotton
Red silk satin ribbons
18.5” x 9.5”
Very good condition

Home sewers often made flat cloth bags like this to hold their stockings or handkerchiefs. The floral pattern on this cloth is particularly appealing. It is evocative of a French Provincial look.

Price: $30.00
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ZINNIAS ORIGINAL PAINTED TEXTILE DESIGN (VFOTNB-123)

 

France, c.1920s
Gouache on paper
14” high x 12.5” wide (without the gray edge)
The paint has rubbed off in areas, but is stable and not flaking

This pattern probably would have been printed on cotton cloth and used for home furnishings, e.g. curtains, duvets, etc.

The bottom image shows how the painting would look if framed with an oval mat.

Price: $125.00
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BUGJAMA (ATOTNB-176)

Uzbekistan, c.1970s-80s

32” x 32” (plus 3” fringe)
Silk hand-embroidery on dark red cotton sateen
Silk fringe with old plastic & pearl buttons
Chain-stitched border
Unlined
Very good condition

A bugjama was used to wrap clothing and bedding (the bottom two photos show a complete bugjama). Often they were cut down like this piece and laid between the stack of bedding quilts (called a “chuk”) with the decorative embroidery hanging down in front. With time, the plain cotton or wool cloth (red was the preferred color) was often discarded and only the embroidery retained.

Small stylized ram’s horn motifs, protective symbols, are used in the border pattern.
This would work well as a cover for a small end table.

Price: $75.00
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OLD BATIK SAMPLES Showing Dyeing Steps (VFOTNB-117)

Java, 20th century

Each piece approximately 21” x 10”
Cotton cloth with wax still intact
Very good condition

These samples show five steps in the wax batik process. Each piece of cloth still retains the wax as applied in that particular step. The wax has not been scraped off the final sample.

These pieces give a real hands-on feeling of the different dyeing stages that can often be hard to discern from photographs.

A booklet is also offered on my website (under BAZAAR – RARE & VINTAGE BOOKS) that explains the process step by step and also includes actual batik samples.

Price: $75.00
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VINTAGE FAUX-IKAT COTTON QUILT COVER (VFOTSC-118)

Uzbekistan, circa 1970s

87” long x 74” wide
Three joined lengths of good quality printed-cotton fabric: 2 panels at 87”x30”; one panel 87”x14”
Very good condition except for one small tear and one patch (see bottom photos). Fabric strong.
Illustrated in SILK and COTTON, page 272

This was used as a quilt cover (“kurpa”) over a thick cotton insert. Many Uzbek homes had little furniture and “kurpas” such as this example were spread on the floor at night to sleep on. During the day they would be folded up and neatly stacked with other bedding in a pile against the wall. This stack was called a “chuk”

The archival photograph by Max Penson, c.1930s-40s, shows an Uzbek family having a meal with stacks of bedding quilts lining the wall behind them. A faux-ikat quilt can be seen in the top left corner.

The top photo shows one quarter of the quilt cover (too large for me to shoot the entire piece).

Price: $75.00
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RUSSIAN TRADE CLOTH (VFOTSC-119)

Exported to Uzbekistan, c.1900

Length of roller-printed cotton 56” x 22.5”
Right selvedge intact, but missing 1.5” along the left side
Produced in Russia for export to Central Asia
Good condition. This fabric was used as a quilt cover or backing so there are small scattered holes where the batting was tacked down – all hardly noticeable. There are a few ¼” holes that are visible in the detail photos.
Illustrated in SILK and COTTON , page 288

This is an unusual pattern with its clocks (hands frozen at 1:30) and ornate chandeliers. It was made in Russian during the late 19th – early 20th century most likely specifically for export to Central Asia. While this piece was used to make a quilt – other examples from my collection with this same pattern lined a woman’s paranja and a silk ikat robe. All of these pieces were found in Uzbekistan.

Price: $100.00
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FAUX IKAT COTTON CLOTH (VFRT-117)

Central Asia, c.1970s

27.5” selvedge to selvedge; 70” length; 15.5” repeat
Factory-printed cotton (fabric is shown folded in half)
Good used condition – three holes (see detail photo) midway in length and 10” in from right selvedge; a few small stains
Illustrated in RUSSIAN TEXTILES page 184

This fabric has a very soft hand and is printed on good quality cotton. It was probably used as a backing at one time. There are no signs of stitching on the fabric except on the selvedge edges.

It was most likely printed in one of the Soviet-built textile combines in either Uzbekistan or Tajikistan.
It will probably wash well by hand in cold water – a sample test did not run.

Price: $50.00
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UZBEK BLOCK-PRINTED COTTON CLOTH (VFNB-116)

Uzbekistan, late 19th-early 20th century

92” long x 57” wide (photos show fabric folded in half)
Five joined lengths of handwoven, homespun cloth; each 11.5” (selvedge to selvedge)
Natural dyes – probably madder
Four holes (two of them patched with printed cotton)
Good to fair condition – small scattered stains and fading

This block-printed cloth was probably used as a backing for a quilt. While rather crudely printed, it has an appealing hand-made look. The printed fabric was called “chit”. The plain-weave cotton cloth itself was called variously, “karbos”; “karbaz”; “bos”; “boz”)

This large amount of fabric could serve well for restoration projects.

Price: $75.00
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FAUX-IKAT QUILT (VFNB-115)

Uzbekistan, circa 1970s

78” high x 69” wide
16” repeat (The entire length of cloth is not shown in the photo.)
Three joined lengths of cotton faux-ikat; each 28”x78” (selvedge to selvedge); 27.5”x78”; 13.5”x72”
Machine-printed faux-ikat front and floral cotton backing; probably printed in the Tashkent Textile Combine
Three cotton patches on the backing
Cotton batting has been removed
The top photo shows one quarter of the folded kurpa.
Good condition except for area of stains along bottom and small area of light red stain (see detail photos). The cloth is strong with no tears or color runs.

Faux-ikat was very popular both for girls’ and womens’ dresses and for bedding quilts and floor cushions. Less expensive than real ikat, it was printed on silk as well as cotton.
There was little furniture in a Central Asian home. Large floor cushions served as seating. Thick quilts (called “kurpa”) were laid on the floor and acted as mattresses and covers. When not in use, they were folded and carefully stacked against a wall. This pile of bedding quilts was called a “chuk”.

The archival photo (c.1930s-40s) by Max Penson shows an Uzbek family taking a meal with their stack of quilts piled neatly behind them. The top left quilt is made from faux-ikat cloth.
The bottom photo was taken recently in the Tashkent kurpa bazaar.

Price: $125.00
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UZBEK DOWRY RUIJO (ATTHOTSC-159)

Samarkand, Uzbekistan. Mid-20th century

79” x 63”
Silk hand- embroidery on cotton sateen
Blue cotton trim
Unlined
Good condition except for discoloration in center panel; a few minor holes
Illustrated in SILK and COTTON, page 199

A ruijo was a young woman’s dowry textile. It would be used as a bedsheet on a newlyweds’ bed. Called a “ruijo” in the Bukhara region or “choishab” in Tashkent, it was patterned on three sides. The center panel was traditionally left plain. While similar in style to a prayer mat (“joinomoz”), the ruijo was larger and the niche was not pointed.

The teapots are symbols of hospitality. The narrow outer border pattern is typical of Samarkand embroideries from this period.

Price: $75.00
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FAUX-IKAT CLOTH (VFOTNB-115)

Uzbekistan, circa 1980s

96” x 39” (selvedges may have been removed, but this is a standard width)
13” repeat (The entire length of cloth is not shown in the photo.)
May be silk, or perhaps a silk blend
Machine-woven and screen-printed
Like-new condition

Faux-ikat was very popular with Central Asian women and girls. Printed ikat such as this cloth would have been made into chemises like the one in the photo below.

The photograph of young women modeling the latest styles is from an Uzbek fashion magazine from 1975.

If you are interested in this fabric, please contact Susan Meller.

Price: $75 for the entire length

Price: $75.00
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FAUX-IKAT SILK SATEEN (VFOTNB-114)

Uzbekistan, circa 1980s

94” x 38” selvedge to selvedge (both selvedges intact)
28” repeat (Each orange tulip is 12” from top to bottom of the stem. The entire length of cloth is not shown in the photo.)
Machine-woven and screen-printed high luster silk sateen with tulip motifs
Printed at the V.V. Kuybisheva Factory, Margilan
Like-new condition

Faux-ikat was very popular with Central Asian women and girls. Printed silk ikat such as this cloth would have been made into chemises like the one in the photo below.

The photograph of young women modeling the latest styles is from an Uzbek fashion magazine from 1975.

If you are interested in this fabric, please contact Susan Meller.

Price: $75 for the entire length

Price: $75.00
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SEGUSHA (ATOTNB-173)

Uzbekistan, c.1970s

21” x 3.25” left embroidered section; 17” x 3.25”” right embroidered section
Netting and fringe: 6”
Silk hand-embroidered cross-stitch on cotton
Silk hand-made netting and fringe with large black glass beads, silver metal spacers, and small multi-colored glass beads
Partially backed with printed-stripe cotton cloth
Excellent condition

Segusha, or saye gosha, are V-shaped embroideries used to embellish the bedding stack (chuk). They were usually part of a larger piece of cloth that was laid between the quilts with the decorative embroidery hanging down in front. With time, the plain cotton or wool cloth (red was the preferred color) was often discarded and only the embroidery retained.

The main motifs on this piece are “tumars” (protective amulets).

If you don’t have a “chuk” to embellish, this segusha would make a striking statement sewn onto the front or back of a cape or poncho. Also works well as a belly-dance accessory.

Price: $100.00
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SEGUSHA (ATOTNB-172)

UZBEKISTAN, 1982-87

31” across top x 26” center of top to bottom of fringe
Silk hand-embroidered cross-stitch on cotton
Dated “1982” and signed “CHIZHON”
Braided silk netting
Silk fringe with beads
Red cotton backing
Excellent condition

Segusha, or saye gosha, are V-shaped embroideries used to embellish the bedding stack (chuk). They were usually part of a larger piece of cloth that was laid between the quilts with the decorative embroidery hanging down in front. With time, the plain cotton or wool cloth (red was the preferred color) was often discarded and only the embroidery retained.

This piece is signed and dated (1982 or 1987) in the embroidery. Motifs include two griffons; tulips; roses; and cotton blossoms.

Price: $150.00
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CRADLE PAD (ATOTSC-171)

Uzbekistan, first quarter 20th century

15” x 38”
All-silk “atlas” ikat
Russian Turkey-red roller-printed cotton backing
Black cotton trim
Very good condition – no color runs, stains or splits on ikat; a few very minor stains on backing
Illustrated in SILK and COTTON, page 195

A traditional baby cradle (beshik) was crafted of wood with a horizontal turned handle and a round hole in the bottom. A thick pad with a corresponding hole was laid in the cradle to serve as a mattress. A clay pot (“beshik tuvak) was placed under the the cradle hole to catch the baby’s urine as it was directed into the pot by a clay pipe. After the baby was swaddled in, a cover (“beshikpush” – see item ATOTTHSC-104, OTHER TEXTILES) was draped over the top rail to keep out drafts, light, dust, insects, and any jealous evil spirits.
The pattern on the cover was designed to conform to the cradle structure.

Price: $150.00
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VELVET WEDDING SCARF (ATBBOTNB-148)

Uzbekistan, 3rd-4th quarter 20th century

21” x 21”
Hand-embroidered gold-wrapped threads, small glass beads, spangles on dark burgandy silk velvet
Inner border: gold lurex machine-embroidered fabric
Outer border: hand-embroidered cross-stitched tape
Backed with printed fabric
Good condition except for missing “fringe” of dangling tassels; lurex threads need trimming.
Similar piece illustrated in Silk and Cotton page 109

Called a “kulrumal”, fancy embroidered pieces like this are a part of certain traditional Uzbek and Tajik wedding ceremonies. The bride carries one folded into a triangle over her right arm and uses it to partially hide her face during her ritual bow (kelin salom) to guests (see bottom photo).
The pair of birds are symbols of mutual happiness.
This would make a most luxurious pillow.

Price: $50.00
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UZBEK PRINTED COTTON CLOTH (VFOTNB-113)

Uzbekistan, circa 1970s

80” x 31” (selvedge to selvedge)
Good quality cotton
Selvedges intact
Good condition,except for some light stains (see bottom four photos)

A pretty length of floral fabric – most likely used for a quilt cover.

Beginning in the 1930s, the Soviets built large textile combines in Central Asia that both wove and printed cloth. This fabric was very likely produced in the Tashkent Textile Combine – the largest in Central Asia.

Price: $100.00
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SEGUSHA (ATOTNB-141)

Uzbekistan, circa 1960s-70s

24” (left section); 24” (right section); 6” wide; 7” netting and tassels
Silk hand-embroidery on black cotton
Applied cross stitch border
Silk tassels with blue glass beads and silver metal ornaments
Unlined
Very good condition – no tassels are missing and most are completely intact; some need the upper green wrapping cord rewound.

Segusha, or saye gosha, are V-shaped embroideries used to embellish the bedding stack (chuk). They were usually part of a larger piece of cloth that was laid between the quilts with the decorative embroidery hanging down in front. With time, the plain cotton or wool cloth (red was the preferred color) was often discarded and only the embroidery retained.

This is an attractive segusha on its own, however it offers a creative sewer the chance to utilize some terrific handmade tassels; the lovely embroidered narrow band; and the main V-shaped embroidery.

Price: $120.00
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SEGUSHA (ATBBOTNB-102)

Uzbekistan, c.1960s

35” (across widest point) x 18” (height from center to tip of embroidery) x 4” netting and tassels trim
Silk hand-embroidery on black cotton; unlined
Silk (?) netting with silk tassels
All of the embroidery is of one piece – it was NOT sewn in separate pieces and then joined together.
Excellent condition

Segusha, or saye gosha, are V-shaped embroideries used to embellish the home bedding stack (chuk). They were usually part of a larger piece of cloth that was laid between the quilts with the decorative embroidery hanging down in front. With time, the plain cotton or wool cloth (red was the preferred color) was often discarded and only the embroidery retained.

Price: $50.00
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SEGUSHA (ATOTNB-139)

Uzbek, probably Lakai. Second quarter 20th century

28” (left panel); 22” (right panel); 4.5” wide; 7” fringe
Hand-embroidered silk fine cross-stitches on what appears to be handwoven cotton
Factory-made plain red cotton and plain navy blue cotton backing
Silk fringe
Very good condition

Segusha, or saye gosha, are V-shaped embroideries used to embellish the bedding stack (chuk). They were usually part of a larger piece of cloth that was laid between the quilts with the decorative embroidery hanging down in front. With time, the plain cotton or wool cloth (red was the preferred color) was often discarded and only the embroidery retained.

This attractive segusha has rich saturated color and a soft silky hand. Subtle color changes in the embroidery threads used add to the appeal. One small red glass bead has been stitched into the embroidery (visible as a tiny dot in the black and white motif on the right panel).

Price: $150.00
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LENIN RUG (ATOTTHSC-137)

Uzbekistan, circa 1960s

78” x 66”
Hand-knotted wool pile with cotton weft
Cotton fringe
Excellent condition – no color runs, stains, moth holes, or any other damage
Illustrated in SILK and COTTON page 198

Cult of Personality rugs with larger-than-life portraits of Soviet leaders were popular during this period. They were used mainly as wall hangings.

This rug features Vladimir Ilyich Lenin (1870-1924) in an iconic pose against a bold splash of red. Traditional Central Asian rug motifs make up the border.
The Cyrillic letters spell out: “V.I. Lenin”.

The last four photos show the reverse side of the rug.

Price: $500.00
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UZBEK HEADBAND (ATOTRNB-125)

Uzbekistan, first half 20th century

21” x 3.5” (as shown, but not including ties)
Very fine silk cross-stitch hand-embroidery
Russian printed-cotton on either end of embroidery
Russian printed-cotton backing
Fair condition; minor embroidery wear; colors seem somewhat dulled; red cotton ends and ties probably added at a later date

This embroidery may or may not have started out as a headband. The two Turkey-red printed cottons and the printed cotton ties were definitely added at a later date than the embroidery.
The printed cotton backing is a Russian export fabric.

Price: $60.00
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UZBEK HEADBAND (ATOTRNB-126)

Uzbekistan, first half 20th century

22” x 3.25
Very fine silk cross-stitch hand-embroidery
Russian printed-cotton backing (c.1900)
Fair to poor condition; embroidery wear; color runs; dirty

This embroidery probably was made to serve as a headband, however the end ties are missing. The printed cotton backing is a Russian export fabric with an Art Nouveau poppy pattern.
The triangular motifs on the embroidery represent amulets (“tumars”).

Price: $50.00
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TEKKE TURKMEN COLLAR TRIM (ATOTRNB-123)

Tekke Turkmen, Central Asia. First half 20th century

22” x 4.5”
Hand-embroidered very fine silk lacing stitch (“kesdi”) on red handwoven silk
Handwoven checked and striped silk backing and indigo cotton blockprint
Excellent condition

Turkmen women embroidered elaborate trim for the collars of their robes.
The stitching was very fine and when the robes were no longer serviceable, the embroidered collars were often removed and reused on another robe.
Stylized tulips form a border.

Price: $50.00
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IKAT PANEL (ATTHOTSC-108)

Samarkand, Uzbekistan. 1960s

84” x 56”
Silk atlas ikat; blue weft
Unlined
Good condition – no tears, fading, or color runs. Some small scattered dark specks and some minor stains.
lllustrated in SILK and COTTON page 213

Ikat panels like this were woven on an extra-large loom that enabled the creation of large-scale, one-piece ikats that could be used as hangings or quilt tops. This type of ikat was produced as early as 1918 and as late as the 1960s. This piece was made in the Samarkand silk factory 26 Bakinskih Komissarov.

Price: $150.00
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IKAT PANEL (ATTHOTSC-107)

Samarkand, Uzbekistan. 1960s

84” x 56”
Silk atlas ikat; red weft
Unlined
Excellent condition
Illustrated in SILK and COTTON page 213

Ikat panels like this were woven on an extra-large loom that enabled the creation of large-scale, one-piece ikats that could be used as hangings or quilt tops. This type of ikat was produced as early as 1918 and as late as the 1960s.

Price: $100.00
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CRADLE COVER (ATOTTHSC-104)

Samarkand, Uzbekistan. Third quarter 20th century

57” x 64”
Hand-embroidered cotton couching and chain stitch on cotton
Black cotton trim
Unlined
Very good condition
Illustrated in SILK and COTTON, page 194

A traditional baby cradle (beshik) was crafted of wood with a horizontal turned handle. A mattress was laid in the cradle and after the baby was swaddled in, a cover (beshikpush) was draped over the top rail to keep out drafts, light, insects, and any jealous evil spirits.
The pattern on the cover was designed to conform to the cradle structure as seen in the photo of an Uzbek woman rocking a cradle with cover.

The bottom photograph from the Library of Congress, 1871-72, shows a cradle maker in the Samarkand bazaar.

Price: $125.00
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ROSE CLUSTERS (VFOTNB-105)

Uzbekistan, c.1970s

Fine quality printed cotton sateen; 29” selvedge to selvedge; 15” repeat (see pillow in photo above).

This fabric and “Roses and Violets” were both probably printed at the Tashkent Textile Combine, the huge vertical mill that was the largest in the Soviet Union at this time. Except for the blue violets, both patterns have the same color palette.

This length of cloth has never been used and is in excellent condition. A test piece was washed in cold water with mild soap and there was no color run.

Sold in 1 yard increments @$75, or $225 for the entire uncut 140” length.

Price: $75.00 per yard
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FLORAL STRIPE with ROSES (VFOTNB-104)

Uzbekistan, c.1960s

Fine quality printed cotton sateen; 27.75” selvedge to selvedge; 16.5” repeat.

A very dramatic pattern with its oversized deep coral roses nestled among blue daisy-like flowers. This length of cloth has never been used and is in excellent condition. A test piece was washed in cold water with mild soap and there was no color run.

Sold in 1 yard increments @$75, or $350 for the entire uncut 6 yard length.

Price: $75.00 per yard
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FAUX-IKAT COTTON CLOTH (VFOTNB-103)

Uzbekistan or Tajikistan, c.1970s

Fine quality printed cotton sateen; 28.5” selvedge to selvedge; 9.5” repeat. (see pillow in photo above).

4 uncut yards in excellent unused condition

Printed in either Uzbekistan or Tajikistan in one of the large textile combines built during the Soviet era.

Other examples of fabrics with printed-ikat patterns are illustrated in SILK and COTTON, pages 272-273.

Faux-ikats were considerably less expensive that the real thing and were very popular with women and girls for robes, dresses, and quilts. The patterns were printed on cotton, silk, and synthetics in the textile mills of Uzbekistan, Tajikistan, and Kyrgyzstan.

This length of cloth has never been used and is in excellent condition. This fabric was not washed because a test piece lost some of the intensity of the sage green when washed in cold water with mild soap.

$75 per yard or $200 for the entire length of 4 yards.

Price: $200.00
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