Bargain Bazaar

Years ago, I collected Central Asian textiles primarily for the Russian printed-cotton cloth that lined them since that was my main interest at the time. Many of these prints found their way into my book, Russian Textiles: Printed Cloth for the Bazaars of Central Asia. As it was next to impossible to find just the cloth by itself, I bought many robes and embroideries simply for their interesting printed linings. Sometimes these pieces were slightly damaged and the prices here reflect that. Other textiles in the BARGAIN BAZAAR are in very good condition and their low prices simply reflect the prices that I was able to acquire them for. I am passing my good fortune along by adding these textiles to the BARGAIN BAZAAR.

These are the pieces that appear here. They may still make attractive wall hangings, or if taken carefully apart, very special pillows. And of course, the fabric patterns are a marvelous source of inspiration for designers.

FAUX-IKAT SILK DRESS (ATRBBSC-229)

Uzbekistan, c.1970s

42” (shoulder to hem);14.5” shoulder to shoulder
Machine-printed faux-ikat on heavy-weight silk sateen
Printed cotton facing
Unlined
Good used condition except for scattered stains in the back (see photos) and two small ¼” holes (see photos).
Illustrated in SILK and COTTON page 94

Women’s and girls’ dresses called “kuylak” (Uzbek) or “kurta” (Tajik) took several forms. Smock-like ones with spread collars such this example first became popular as everyday wear during the Soviet era. They were most often made of atlas ikat and had a more Western cut.

The young women in this archival photograph by Max Penson are wearing kuylaks. The family members are posing by their grape arbor, Uzbekistan, c.1930s-40s.

Price: $40.00
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ANIMAL TRAPPING (ATATBBNB-123)

Central Asia, mid-20th century?

36” wide x 27.5” long (not including fringe)
Silk “atlas” ikat – the rest of the fabrics are cotton
Backed with hand-woven and factory-made cotton cloth
Printed-cotton rag fringe
Entirely hand-sewn
Tears in ikat, otherwise sound

This piece was probably used as an animal trapping of some kind.
The movement of the rag fringe would confuse evil spirits who would fear becoming entangled in it, thus serving as a protective device.

Price: $35.00
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UZBEK BAG (ATBBSBNB-134)

Uzbekistan, mid-20th century

7” x 5.35”
Silk and cotton hand-embroidered chain stitch on cotton
Chain stitch embroidered trim
Russian printed-cotton lining
Good condition

Among the most utilitarian (and beautiful) textiles found in Central Asian homes were bags. Every one of them – from large storage and transport bags to small embroidered bags such as this – had a purpose. The woman who embroidered this bag no doubt had a specific use in mind – perhaps it held personal objects, or small household items.
A nice little bag with a light-colored spiraling sun motif on one side mirrored by a dark sun on the other side.

Price: $30.00
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MIRROR BAG (ATBBNB-109)

Uzbekistan, 3rd quarter 20th century

24” x 24” including fringe
Silk or cotton chain on cotton ground cloth
Machine-embroidered black cotton trim
Backed with printed cotton fabrics
Cotton fringe
Very good condition except for smudge marks in bottom right corner (see detail photo)

Small embroideries like this are often called “mirror bags” (aina khalta).
Originally they were backed with a cloth pouch in order to hold a mirror or other small items. More recently, they were simply used as decorative hangings.
This piece would make a striking pillow.

Price: $40.00
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STOCKING BAG (ATSBOTBBNB-120)

USA, circa 1920s

Roller-printed cotton
Red silk satin ribbons
18.5” x 9.5”
Very good condition

Home sewers often made flat cloth bags like this to hold their stockings or handkerchiefs. The floral pattern on this cloth is particularly appealing. It is evocative of a French Provincial look.

Price: $30.00
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VINTAGE JAPANESE HAND-PAINTED SILK YUZEN (VFNBBB-140)

 

Japan, mid-20th century or older
19” x 14” selvedge to selvedge
Hand-Painted on silk “chirimen” (textured silk crepe)
Good condition except for small hole near top right corner; torn area on top left edge; tiny stitching holes where seam threads were removed

This fabric (called “yuzen”) was hand-painted with textile dyes by means of a complicated process. It was originally part of a woman’s kimono.

Price: $50.00
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VINTAGE JAPANESE HAND-PAINTED SILK YUZEN FRAGMENT (VFNBBB-139)

 

Japan, mid-20th century or older
15” x 13.5” selvedge to selvedge
Hand-Painted on silk “chirimen” (textured silk crepe)
Very good condition – no damage

This fabric (called “yuzen”) was hand-painted with textile dyes by means of a complicated process. It would have been used for a woman’s kimono. It depicts two phoenixes in flight among paulownia flowers.

Price: $25.00
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GROUP of 6 VINTAGE JAPANESE HAND-PAINTED SILK YUZEN (VFNBBB-138)

 

Japan, mid-20th century or older
Assorted sizes
Hand-Painted on silk “chirimen” (textured silk crepe)
All selvedges intact (second dimension is the width) except for #5 Harvest Rake
Good condition – some minor imperfections

These fabrics (called “yuzen”) were hand-painted with textile dyes by means of a complicated process. They would have been used for women’s kimonos. The fragment sizes are as follows: Maple Leaves 17” x 14.4”; #2 Willow Tree on dark purple 15” x 14.25”; #3 Pine Boughs 11.75” x 15.5”; #4 Birds and Flowers 14” x 13”; #5 Harvest Rake 13” x 13”; #6 Leaves 12” x 15”.

Price: $50.00
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VINTAGE JAPANESE HAND-PAINTED SILK YUZEN (VFNBBB-135)

 

Japan, mid-20th century or older
Two separate pieces: 20.5” long x 9” (one selvedge) and 32.5” long x 6.5” (one selvedge)
Hand-Painted on silk “chirimen” (textured silk crepe)
Good condition except for slight marks where stitching was removed.

This fabric (called “yuzen”) was hand-painted with textile dyes by means of a complicated process. This piece was originally part of a young boy’s kimono. It probably depicts characters from a Japanese fairy tale.

Price: $50.00
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VINTAGE JAPANESE HAND-PAINTED SILK YUZEN (VFNBBB-134)

 

Japan, mid-20th century or older
30” long x 14” (selvedge to selvedge)
Hand-Painted on silk “chirimen” (textured silk crepe)
Good condition except for one small hole and notch in the left selvedge.

This fabric (called “yuzen”) was hand-painted with textile dyes by means of a complicated process. This piece was originally part of a woman’s kimono. It shows two peacocks among lilies, carnations, lily-of-the-valley, spider mums, and other flowers.

Price: $30.00
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VINTAGE JAPANESE HAND-PAINTED SILK YUZEN (VFNBBB-133)

 

Japan, mid-20th century or older
24” long x 13” (selvedge to selvedge)
Hand-Painted on silk “chirimen” (textured silk crepe)
Good condition except for some very small scattered holes and notches in the right selvedge.

This fabric (called “yuzen”) was hand-painted with textile dyes by means of a complicated process. This piece was originally part of a woman’s kimono. It is beautifully designed and executed with subtle shading. Butterflies with faux tie-dye wings fly among cherry blossoms, peonies, sweet peas, and spider mums.

Price: $75.00
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"AINA KHALTA" MIRROR BAG (ATTHBBRT-162)

Uzbekistan, 3rd quarter 20th century

24” x 24” (not including fringe)
2” hand-made twisted cotton fringe with metal spangles and small white glass beads
Silk hand-embroidery on maroon cotton
Silk ikat borders
Backed with printed cotton
Very good condition
Lining print Illustrated in RUSSIAN TEXTILES page 127

Small embroideries like this are often called “mirror bags” (aina khalta).
Originally they were backed with a cloth pouch in order to hold a mirror or other small items. More recently, they were simply used as decorative hangings.

Price: $75.00
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CHILD'S IKAT TROUSERS (ATRBBNB-211)

Uzbekistan, c.1970s-80s

20.5” length; 9” waist (as shown with elastic); 2.5” bottom leg opening (with elastic)
Silk ikat with gold Lurex; unlined
Printed cotton waistband
Fair condition – areas of magenta and purple dye runs

Under their dresses, women and girls wore long loose-fitting trousers called “lozim” (Uzbek), or “shalwars” (Tajik) with a drawstring top that rested on the hips. The upper part was usually made with a less expensive fabric. The narrow cuffs were often embellished with embroidery or some kind of fancy trimming.

Traditionally, these trousers were worn from childhood through old age.

Price: $25.00
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WALL HANGING (ATBBTHNB-171)

Uzbekistan, mid-20th century with 19th century ikat

19” x 19” (not including 2.5” dark green cotton fringe)
All cotton except for adras (silk warp/cotton weft) ikat center
Backed with cotton prints
Hand-woven tape border
Fair condition – ikat has damage as seen in detail photo; top left corner of hanging is damaged as seen in detail photo

This hanging was probably made in the mid-20th century. A recycled 19th century piece of handmade adras ikat from an old ikat robe was used in the center.

While this has some condition issues, it still makes an attractive wall hanging – and the two prints on the backing could serve as inspiration for a textile designer.

Price: $50.00
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TAJIK WEDDING VEIL (ATBBRNB-170)

Tajikistan or Uzbekistan, 20th century

17” length x 18” width
Sturdy handmade silk “netting” attached to loosely handwoven cotton borders
Outer borders made of factory cotton and red flannel cotton
Machine-stitched outer border
Fair/good condition – one 1” long area of damaged netting along left center edge (can be repaired); some slight red color run along bottom border; area of discoloration in bottom right corner

This veil may be all original, or it may be a marriage of a recycled older netting and a more recent machine-sewn border. It would have had a tie attached to either end of the red flannel so that the veil could be secured around the bride’s head, thus hiding her face.

It makes an interesting study piece where one can get a close-up look at the intricate method of constructing the silk gridwork.

Price: $35.00
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UZBEK-LAKAI HAT (ATHBBNB-167)

Uzbekistan, mid-20th century

20” circumference x 6.5” diameter x 5.25” high
Silk hand-embroidery on ikat
Applied hand-woven border around rim
Printed cotton lining
Long black thread extending from peak
Very good condition

This hat was probably made in southern Uzbekistan by a woman from the Uzbek-Lakai tribe. Narrow rows of tight machine-stitches create a pleasing ribbed effect

Price: $40.00
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THREE KUCHI BEADED GULS (ATBBNB-143)

Afghanistan, 2nd half 20th century

Glass beads sewn onto stiff backing of layered cotton cloth

Small round “mirror” inserts appear to be made of mica

Large circle: 6.5″ diameter; small circle; 4″ diameter; other gul: 6.5″x6″

Large circle has missing beads as seen in photo, other guls are in perfect condition

The Kuchi tribe are Afghan nomads. These beaded guls (gul means “flower” in Turkic languages) were sewn onto women’s and girls’ garments both as decoration and as talismans. Shiny beads, especially blue beads, were thought to ward off evil spirits.

Price: $18.00
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TURKMEN CAMEL TRAPPING (ATATBBNB-122)

Central Asia, late 19th-early 20th century

53.5” x 40.5” (not including fringe)
Felted wool broadcloth and silk hand-woven stripes patches
Backed with local hand-blocked and hand-woven cotton (all the backing sections are pieces of unseamed cloth)
Fair to poor condition; some patches damaged; no moth holes, stains, or color runs
Lots of good period fabrics for restoration projects.

Called a “kuroma”, this trapping was one of a pair that hung down on each of the camel’s flanks in a Turkmen bridal procession. They were usually backed with a variety of different fabrics, such as Russian printed cotton; Turkmen handwoven stripes (alacha); or local block-printed cotton (chit) – as in this example.

This trapping has condition issues, however it still looks attractive enough to display – or if taken apart, can be used to restore other Turkmen pieces.

Price: $75.00
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FAUX IKAT COTTON CLOTH (VFRT-117)

Central Asia, c.1970s

27.5” selvedge to selvedge; 70” length; 15.5” repeat
Factory-printed cotton (fabric is shown folded in half)
Good used condition – three holes (see detail photo) midway in length and 10” in from right selvedge; a few small stains
Illustrated in RUSSIAN TEXTILES page 184

This fabric has a very soft hand and is printed on good quality cotton. It was probably used as a backing at one time. There are no signs of stitching on the fabric except on the selvedge edges.

It was most likely printed in one of the Soviet-built textile combines in either Uzbekistan or Tajikistan.
It will probably wash well by hand in cold water – a sample test did not run.

Price: $50.00
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CAMEL KNEE TRAPPING (ATATBBNB-121)

Turkmen, Central Asia. Late 19th century

20” x 15.5” including rag fringe
Russian red, green, and black wool broadcloth; Uzbek silk ikat
Backed with Russian plain and printed cotton and Central Asian block-printed handwoven cotton
Cotton and wool broadcloth rag fringe
White hand-embroiderd stitches
Fair condition – ikat strips are worn; 1” split on left black wool border; black narrow band along back not original (easily removed) – otherwise everything period 19th century.

This trapping was one of a pair that was tied around each of the camel’s forelegs in a Turkmen bridal procession. Called a “duye dizlyk”, they were often hung with little bells that jingled as the camels walked.

SOLD

Price: $45.00
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ANIMAL TRAPPING (ATATNB-117)

Central Asia, circa 1960s

44.5” x 6” (not including fringe)
Assorted fabrics; plain and printed cottons; artificial silk; jacquards; knits
Backed with plain and printed printed cottons
Cotton rag fringe (average length 7”)
Machine embroidery
Very good condition

This piece was probably used as an animal trapping of some kind.
The movement of the rag fringe would confuse evil spirits who would fear becoming entangled in it. So it served as a protective device.

This would make a decorative hanging – or even a lively sash for belly-dancing, or just for fun.

Price: $30.00
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BOY’S CHUST-STYLE HAT (ATHBBSC-157)

Kokand, Uzbekistan. c.1990s

18.75” circumference x 4.75” diameter x 4” high
Silk embroidery on what appears to be green silk
Black woven border around rim – looks like cotton
Red cotton lining
Machine “quilted”
Designed to fold into a flat triangle for ease of carrying
Very good condition
Illustrated in SILK and COTTON page 140

The ubiquitous square black skullcap worn mainly by men and boys throughout Uzbekistan originated in the city of Chust, located in the Ferghana Valley. It is characterized by four highly stylized “kalampir” (capsicum peppers). The intense heat of the peppers was thought to protect the wearer from evil spirits. The crown of the hat was encircled by a border of arches which some say symbolize gates through which no enemy can pass.

The pattern varies by region, yet it has remained basically the same since it first gained popularity in the 1920s. This colorful boy’s hat is a departure from the usual black and white Chust-style hat. The archival photograph is by the famous Russian photographer Max Penson. It was taken in Uzbekistan in the 1930s-40s.

Price: $30.00
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CHILD’S VELVET COAT (ATBBRNB-167)

Bukhara(?), Uzbekistan. c.1990s

17.5” shoulder to hem; 9.5” sleeve length
Dark blue velvet (feels like silk, but might be synthetic)
Machine-embroidered; Lurex threads – (One blue flower petal was deliberately left unfinished as custom dictated.)
Synthetic cloth lining
Single button closure
Very good condition

This cute little robe was made for a young boy to wear on festive occasions.
It’s a smaller version of the traditional Bukharan man’s embroidered velvet robe that would have been worn at weddings.
While it’s not hand-embroidered, it still has the look of a special little coat.

Price: $25.00
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VELVET WEDDING SCARF (ATBBOTNB-148)

Uzbekistan, 3rd-4th quarter 20th century

21” x 21”
Hand-embroidered gold-wrapped threads, small glass beads, spangles on dark burgandy silk velvet
Inner border: gold lurex machine-embroidered fabric
Outer border: hand-embroidered cross-stitched tape
Backed with printed fabric
Good condition except for missing “fringe” of dangling tassels; lurex threads need trimming.
Similar piece illustrated in Silk and Cotton page 109

Called a “kulrumal”, fancy embroidered pieces like this are a part of certain traditional Uzbek and Tajik wedding ceremonies. The bride carries one folded into a triangle over her right arm and uses it to partially hide her face during her ritual bow (kelin salom) to guests (see bottom photo).
The pair of birds are symbols of mutual happiness.
This would make a most luxurious pillow.

Price: $50.00
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WALL HANGING (ATBBTHNB-145)

Uzbekistan, mid-20th century

17” x 17” (as shown)
Silk chain stitch on cotton ground cloth
Silk fringe with metal spangles and little clear beads
Backed with dark gray cotton fabric
Very good condition

Small embroideries like this are often called “mirror bags” (aina khalta).
Originally they were backed with a cloth pouch in order to hold a mirror or other small items. More recently, they were simply used as decorative hangings.

Price: $35.00
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SEGUSHA (ATBBOTNB-102)

Uzbekistan, c.1960s

35” (across widest point) x 18” (height from center to tip of embroidery) x 4” netting and tassels trim
Silk hand-embroidery on black cotton; unlined
Silk (?) netting with silk tassels
All of the embroidery is of one piece – it was NOT sewn in separate pieces and then joined together.
Excellent condition

Segusha, or saye gosha, are V-shaped embroideries used to embellish the home bedding stack (chuk). They were usually part of a larger piece of cloth that was laid between the quilts with the decorative embroidery hanging down in front. With time, the plain cotton or wool cloth (red was the preferred color) was often discarded and only the embroidery retained.

Price: $50.00
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TURKMEN CAMEL TRAPPING PANELS (ATATBBNB-110)

Tekke Turkmen, Central Asia. Early 20th century

23” x 3.5” (excluding fringe)
Handwoven silk stripes and imported wool broadcloth patches
Silk fringe
Locally block-printed handwoven cotton backing (madder dye)
Good condition – a few small holes; top left triangular patch stained & torn

These pieces made up the side panels of a “kuroma”. A kuroma hung down on each of the camel’s flanks in a Turkmen bridal procession. They were usually backed with a variety of different fabrics, such as Russian printed cotton; Turkmen handwoven stripes (alacha); or local block-printed cotton (chit). A complete kuroma (ATATSC-109) is also available in the ANIMAL TRAPPING bazaar.

A kuroma can be seen in this archival photo from the Library of Congress, taken in 1911. It shows a Tekke Turkmen family dressed in their best clothing sitting inside their tent. Sunlight streams through the opening at the top of the tent making a pattern on the woven-wool floor carpet.

Price: $50.00
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UZBEK EMBROIDERY (ATBBNB-138)

Lakai (?), Uzbekistan. Early 20th century

6” x 2.5”
Fine silk cross-stitch and chain stitch hand-embroidery on handwoven natural cotton
Russian printed-cotton backing
Very good condition; no color runs; no embroidery damage

This small embroidery is complete in itself, although it was no doubt part of a larger item.
The pattern is often associated with Lakai embroidery.
A nice, early little piece that shows examples of various sewing techniques

Price: $25.00
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KULTA (ATBBHNB-135)

South Uzbekistan. Third quarter 20th century

Cap 7” diameter; tail 16” x 7.25”
Silk hand-embroidery on gray cotton; hand-embroidered trim
Printed striped-cotton lining
Fair to good condition; embroidery fine, but cap has been patched and gray ground cloth has faded.

Some Uzbek and Tajik women wore soft rounded caps with a long embroidered plait-cover that extended down the back. Called a kulta, kultapush, or kiygich, it served not only to cover a woman’s head, but her long braids as well.

Price: $35.00
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FERGHANA VALLEY HAT (ATBBHNB-129)

Ferghana Valley, Uzbekistan. circa 1970s

20.5” circumference x 6” diameter x 2.5” high
Silk hand-embroidery (tiny cross-stitches called“iroki”)
Black velvet trim
Plain red cotton lining
Good used condition – very slight color run

This girl’s hat is embroidered with a type of fine cross-stitch called “iroki”. It resembles petit point in appearance and covers the entire surface of the hat.
The hat has been worn and as such no longer retains the sharp squared-look. However it sits nicely on the head.

Price: $25.00
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FERGHANA VALLEY HAT (ATBBNB-128)

Ferghana Valley, Uzbekistan. circa 1970s

19” circumference x 5.5” diameter x 3” high
Silk hand-embroidery (tiny cross-stitches called“iroki”)
Black silk(?) trim
Plain black cotton and plain white cotton lining
Excellent condition

This hat is embroidered with a type of fine cross-stitch called “iroki”. It resembles petit point in appearance and covers the entire surface of the hat.
The brim of this hat has been stiffened – it was not designed to fold flat

Price: $35.00
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TURKMEN BAG (ATBBSBNB-119)

Turkmen, Central Asia. Early 20th century

9.5” x 5.25”
Silk hand-embroidery with very small, white, machine stitches
Handwoven striped alacha
Braided black trim
Good to fair condition – the alacha is soiled

Among the most utilitarian (and beautiful) textiles found in Central Asian homes were bags. Every one of them – from large storage and transport bags to small finely embroidered bags such as this – had a purpose. The woman who embroidered the top of this bag and wove the striped fabric no doubt had a specific use in mind – perhaps it held personal objects, or small household items.

Price: $40.00
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CAMEL KNEE TRAPPING (ATBBATNB-112)

Turkmen. Central Asia, 2nd quarter 20th century

16” x 12” (as shown)
Hand-embroidered; wool broadcloth; cotton; handwoven alacha stripes
Wool tassels and braided ties
Fair to good condition; some insect damage to green wool on two hanging side strips

This trapping was one of a pair that was tied around each of the camel’s forelegs in a Turkmen bridal procession. Called a “duye dizlyk”, they were often hung with little bells that jingled as the camels walked. The dangling tassels helped confuse evil spirits and the small applied triangles served as amulets to help ward them off.
The fabrics are all recycled cotton and wool, including handwoven Turkmen stripes.

Price: $30.00
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WOMAN’S HEADBAND (ATBBRSC-111)

Bukhara, Uzbekistan. 2nd half 20th century

4.25” x 56”
Metallic gold and silver hand-embroidery with spangles and glass beads
Black and rose silk velvet inserts
Silk jacquard backing and ties
Very good condition; small area of damage to edge of silk jacquard
Illustrated in SILK and COTTON page112

Gold embroidered headbands called “peshanaband” were favored by the ladies of Bukhara.

Price: $50.00
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